Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Our New 2020 GS20 AND GEL COAT DAMAGE!? (Can't Believe It ...)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Our New 2020 GS20 AND GEL COAT DAMAGE!? (Can't Believe It ...)

    I don’t really know where to start (sorry about the length, but I hope that you enjoy the photos), … our family took “contactless” delivery of our new 2020 GS20 from a dealer within our Nautique dealership territory over the past weekend (the dealership delivered it to our storage facility during a rainstorm that impacted our area—the dealer delivered it as “new” (15.3 hrs. on the boat: see my earlier post over in the "Trailer Discussion" group). We had worked over the telephone to “do the deal”—and, in many ways, felt extremely lucky to find a GS20 that seemed to be set up for our family during these challenging COVID-dominated times. The boat that the dealer delivered was not in “showroom” shape like we had hoped: the delivery revealed several relatively small issues that the images from the dealer had not exposed (some minor damage to the SeaDek, a bit dirty—it had apparently spent some time on their lot uncovered, gel coat/rub rail near the cleats on both sides, a couple of bow scuffs from power loading)—we figured we could get these cosmetic issues addressed—the dealer agreed to do so and the price seemed to reflect the boat’s condition/“use”—so we went ahead with the deal (I had to set my OCD way over to the side). In anticipation of the delivery, we took yesterday off to go to the lake. Here is a picture of our new GS as we headed to the lake yesterday late-morning (along with our two “silly hearts”—love and spoil those two):

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Nautique_NewGS20w-Kids - 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	128.0 KB ID:	620604

    Note: It was really hard to let our ’94 SN go (so many memories made on that amazing skier over the past eight years … just the type of boat that I was fortunate to drive and ski behind as an adolescent)—just know that this GS20 is a HUGE upgrade for us (my wife and I are old-school slalom skiers), both our children slalom ski but want to progress their wakeboarding and, of course, surf! Our old '94 SN (I completed a full restoration of the trailer myself):

    Click image for larger version  Name:	'94 SN SOLD - 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	76.3 KB ID:	620605


    Now the part that I need help with: Our family has a long-standing habit of rubbing down the hull with towels prior to putting the boat back on the trailer (we do it out on the water at our last swim break … it gives us some time to chill, swim, have a bit more fun before heading to boat ramp—it also cuts down with the amount of “muscle” that we usually have to wipe down after we put the boat back on the trailer). Please note that we do always wipe the entire boat again after we put it back on the trailer! During the pre-trailer wipe down out on the lake, I discovered the gel coat damage shown below. (My wife and I are “pros” … we neither damaged the boat getting it off the trailer—we slid it into the water; nor hit anything while enjoying the day on the lake—all middle of the lake fun getting to know our new boat: we sacrificed the better water on the lake for just the point of learning the surf, wakeboard, ski and upgraded functions without having to focus on navigating potential more constricted water … had we hit something that hard we would have known—trailer or otherwise … period!) I immediately called the dealer. Our salesperson was responsive and attentive. I suggested speculatively that someone likely didn’t tell him that they had hit something while the boat was out on a “demo”—he did not know, I SURE DID NOT!? I just wanted to call and let him know what I found before I put the boat up on the trailer!

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Gel Coat Damage W Correct Notation - 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	48.7 KB ID:	620610

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Gel Coat Damage _ Scale - 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	61.7 KB ID:	620607


    Here is a picture of the trailer I took prior to loading the boat (I searched for any exposed bolts, trailer damage ... could not find anything):

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Trailer_NoDamage - 1 (1).jpg Views:	0 Size:	126.6 KB ID:	620608
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Trailer_w Damage Indicator - 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	128.5 KB ID:	620609

    A final picture of the boat back on the trailer enduring its post-load wipe down (my wife is in there somewhere):

    Click image for larger version  Name:	PostLoad_Wipe Down - 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	91.8 KB ID:	620611

    Long story short, or shorter … the dealership wants to repair the damage but has encouraged our family to keep using the boat until the end of the season (we will only go to the lake once each week, with a longer period of four days near the end of the month where had planned to go each day for four consecutive days in a row—the boat always comes out of the water at day’s end)—the summer is fading, we have limited time, the dealer’s gel coat repair person is booked out, etc. We would likely put the boat up for good on or around the last week of September or first week of October. I am concerned about longer warranty issues if I don’t get it fixed immediately—which seems nearly impossible to do—(the dealer says not to worry about water intrusion to the glass or warranty issues), but know that I also had hoped to give my family a bit of relief by being able to enjoy some time out the water before the boating season ends? The dealership is suggesting “use it” … again, don’t worry about it, get it repaired in the off season.

    Really appreciate all the advice and suggestions.
    In advance of driving to my regional Nautique dealership, I am trying to determine the correct rise/drop for my rig (a 2020 Tundra TRD Pro, 18" to top of 2" receiver hitch) in case I decide to purchase a 2020 GS20 that I considering. Does anyone have the correct measurement for a level loaded trailer (i.e. ground to
    Last edited by gsyogi; 08-11-2020, 01:00 PM.

  • #2
    I'd use the boat until the end of the season. How about getting your appointment date set right now for Mid October? Get a rubbing compound and go over the whole area a couple times you will probably feel a little better seeing it shine back up again. It may just be the one long scratch that needs work. If you feel a little betrayed by the deal I would ask for some free swag like some boards for the kids if they sell any of that stuff at the dealer. I chipped my bow powering on like an idiot it happens and the bow landed in the small gap between the rollers, I bought the gel coat repair kit and patched it myself you can tell when you are up close to it.

    Comment


    • #3
      It looks way worse on black but I had a chip right on the chine line (where the boat goes from side to bottom) for most of a season before I had it fixed. When it was at the gelcoat guy's place he found a bunch more damage on the bottom of the boat. He said "average for a boat with this kind of hours". (That was about 350 hours FWIW). I asked him about water intrusion and he said not an issue. And the damage there was way worse than what you're showing.

      Long story short, finish your season, fix in off season. Enjoy your time on the water.
      2001 Ski Nautique / 2007 SV211 TE (gone but not forgotten)

      Comment


      • #4
        Gelcoat is easy to fix and polish. And sea deck is easy to clean. Let the dealer fix the gel coat at the end of the season and give it a good detail. I don't see any real problem, honestly.

        I'd also note, on these new boats with complicated hull designs, it is a lot harder to keep scuffs off the bottom when trailering, especially with a black hull. If you think you are going to keep the bottom of the hull scuff free for any period of time I think you are in for a disappointing experience no matter how careful you are. You might consider something like gator back bunk rails, but it is almost impossible to keep the carpet from scuffing the hull even if you float it on.

        Also, with a black boat, if you don't have one already, I'd suggest getting a Rupes Mille or Flex XC3410 gear driven orbital buffer and some good wool and foam pads. Black takes work to keep it looking nice; a rotary leaves holograms; and a random orbital does not generally have enough cutting/polishing power for gel coat.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yea I know this LOOKS really bad but it isn't. It's just a gel-coat gouge. A good shop will fix that and you will never be able to find where it was. It's AMAZING what they can do.

          Keep using the boat, let your dealer fix it in the fall. It won't hurt a thing to run it like this.

          -Charles

          Comment


          • #6
            Agree with everything above. Pretty long post about a scratch that the dealer agreed to fix but wants to ensure you to have the boat for the full season.

            Sounds like they're treating you great in just about every regard. Congrats on the new boat.

            Comment


            • #7
              Get rid of the towels to wipe down and use a nice microfiber cloth and something other than water. There are many spray products out there.

              If you use regular towels, you're going to have surface swirls and marks all over that black gel coat.

              Sent from my SM-J337V using Tapatalk

              Comment


              • #8
                I really appreciate all the thoughtful responses, it is great news that we will be able to keep on using the boat for the remainder of the season!!! Concerning the maintenance of the black gel coat (onyx black): As to jjackkrash's spot-on comment, I won’t be disappointed, but as I told our salesperson when initially contemplating this purchase, I don’t have any experience with maintaining a dark-colored boat … the honest response was “maintain it like I/we did the old one”—I can clearly see now (only after a single outing) that there is going to be quite a bit more to it! I don’t know if this is the appropriate place to post this in, but I would welcome suggestions on how to maintain this dark gel coat up from this point forward? Skidave, I will be ditching the regular towels … curious if you have any specific recommendations as to the detail spray for the wipe down after taking the boat out of the water?

                Originally posted by jjackkrash View Post
                Gelcoat is easy to fix and polish. And sea deck is easy to clean. Let the dealer fix the gel coat at the end of the season and give it a good detail. I don't see any real problem, honestly.

                I'd also note, on these new boats with complicated hull designs, it is a lot harder to keep scuffs off the bottom when trailering, especially with a black hull. If you think you are going to keep the bottom of the hull scuff free for any period of time I think you are in for a disappointing experience no matter how careful you are. You might consider something like gator back bunk rails, but it is almost impossible to keep the carpet from scuffing the hull even if you float it on.

                Also, with a black boat, if you don't have one already, I'd suggest getting a Rupes Mille or Flex XC3410 gear driven orbital buffer and some good wool and foam pads. Black takes work to keep it looking nice; a rotary leaves holograms; and a random orbital does not generally have enough cutting/polishing power for gel coat.
                jjackkrash, please feel free to send me a PM as I would really like to get your thoughts on both the "Gatorbak" bunks and also the orbital buffer (as well as the best compounds to use)?

                I am also curious if anyone has considered treating the tower Bimini the Bimini cover with a fabric protectant, i.e. 303 Aerospace?



                Comment


                • #9
                  I can't vouch for GatorBunks, but I have been looking at those and similar products for a bit because the carpet is so abrasive. I am a bit hesitant to go that route, however, because abrasive, i.e., friction, is a good feature when you are running down the road and don't want to the boat to move. I have become somewhat resigned to bottom scratches because nobody ever sees them but me when I am under the boat and they are purely a cosmetic issue.

                  As far as boat detailing, that's a long topic, but I bought Mike Phillips book and it is a goldmine of information. He also has a lot of youtube videos on marine detailing and detailing in general.

                  https://www.marine31.com/marine-31-boat-book.html

                  As far as buffers go, I use all Rupes products. They are spendy, but everything is color coded and the system is pretty much idiot proof. For gel, with a gear driven orbital, course and medium wool pads take out scratches, and course and medium foam pads polish. For tough oxidation or thick scratches I use a wool pad and a rotary followed by the orbital to polish. Then apply wax.

                  https://www.autogeek.net/rupes-wool-pads.html

                  https://www.autogeek.net/rupes-mille-foam-pads.html

                  https://www.autogeek.net/rupes-polishers.html

                  You don't need to run the buffers all that often if you keep the boat clean and waxed, but with a black boat, I personally can't see going without some sort of mechanical polisher to use when needed and being happy with how it looks. You are gonna get scuffs if you use the boat, but short of deep scratches, minor scuffs polish right out of the gel with the right tools.

                  I also like Babes boat products, including Babes Seat Soap and their seat protector which has UV protection. I would use the 303 fabric coating on the cover and bimini and regular 303 on the dash and other interior items for the UV protection.

                  Oh, and your boat looks awesome. Congrats on the new ride!
                  Last edited by jjackkrash; 08-11-2020, 11:57 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Congrats on the boat, looks great. I'm with others, continue to use the boat. That damage is not at all threatening. Looks like a rock or screw from a trailer. Just because you got it with the included trailer doesn't mean this boat was never placed on another trailer during those 15 hours.

                    Trailer looks like it has a touch too much tongue weight, IMO. I would bump it up one notch if you have an adjustable hitch. the TRD pros trucks and 4runnser can be harder to judge what's safe like ford raptors due to the offroad suspension. the suspensions will react to just placing a person in the bed, let alone a hundred pounds of tongue weight.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I had a gel blemish from the dealership that I discovered on my first wipe down of the boat. I was super pissed to have a gel coat repair with under 5 hours on it. However, my dealership got it repaired by a very good fiberglass/gel shop. I couldn't find it if I tried. They hooked me up with some gear to appease the experience. Nautique and your dealer will take care of you.

                      Just make sure you are respectful You want to build a good relationship with the dealer.

                      These boats are massive, demo'd, and hand built. It's tough to keep them perfect.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Congrats, beautiful boat!

                        I can 100% recommend the Gatorbak bunks, I installed mine in June 2019 and have zero regrets (few pics below from 2019). I have a 2014 S244 with black gelcoat hull and the bunk carpet just holds small debris and kept scratching my hull bottom even tho I NEVER power loaded on or off. Its just the nature of carpet The Gatorbak is made from a composite and is not "slippery", so you have zero worries there and after looking at every option on the market, it seemed to be the best to me. Its more expensive obviously... but will also outlast carpet by a long shot and after over a year of loading/unloading the Gatorbak still looks new. Initially some parts of the composite will "wear" due to how boat sits but thats normal and it doesnt scratch the hull at all. Another HUGE benefit to me was, I keep my boat in garage and after putting the boat on the trailer, the carpet bunks would sometimes still feel wet after 3 days of being inside the garage. The Gatorbak bunks have ridges and drain the water immediately and within a couple hours even the pressure treated wood under the bunks is dry!
                        Having a black hull is good/bad, if you keep up with it, IMO nothing looks sexier. If you neglect it, it can look bad quickly from water spots, the small "swirls" that will pop up from wiping it down, etc. I had to temper my OCD on the small stuff, mostly cause I was the only one who saw that stuff... everyone else was busy talking about how great it looked. I do my best to keep it clean/perfect.... but essentially its impossible to stay "perfect" under normal use and for the most part I just take the time to polish it up during the winter layup. I always make sure to put a good wax coat on in the Spring before using it and that combined with regular wipe-downs after using it, boat stays looking sharp.

                        The "Hot Sauce" is my favorite for wiping down, with a small amount, it easily cuts the water spots and puts back a light wax coat. Makes the black gelcoat look brand new every time!

                        FYI.... when I bought my boat used it had some lite gouges under hull similar to your picture, the 1st owner kept it at a marina with dry storage and the guys that operated the fork lifts were anything but careful which is what created the scratches/gouges. You will be fine till winter. If you want.... you could seal the gouged areas (I did this after first getting my boat till I was able to fix that winter). I basically got under the boat with some wax and rubbed a good bit of it into the gouges to give it an extra layer of sealer. When they repair the gouges.... they would lightly sand it out anyway to ensure the new gelcoat bonds properly which would remove any wax. Worked great for me tho. I am a DIY guy so I bought some color matched gelcoat and did the repairs myself, since I also taught myself how to wetsand, compound & polish, the repairs came out looking like it never happened. It takes time to do it right, especially with black gelcoat but with the right equipment and attention to detail, they can make pretty much any damage look like it never happened.
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Another general thank you to everyone who has contributed to my inquiry:

                          Originally posted by jjackkrash View Post
                          I can't vouch for GatorBunks, but I have been looking at those and similar products for a bit because the carpet is so abrasive. I am a bit hesitant to go that route, however, because abrasive, i.e., friction, is a good feature when you are running down the road and don't want to the boat to move. I have become somewhat resigned to bottom scratches because nobody ever sees them but me when I am under the boat and they are purely a cosmetic issue.

                          As far as boat detailing, that's a long topic, but I bought Mike Phillips book and it is a goldmine of information. He also has a lot of youtube videos on marine detailing and detailing in general.

                          https://www.marine31.com/marine-31-boat-book.html

                          As far as buffers go, I use all Rupes products. They are spendy, but everything is color coded and the system is pretty much idiot proof. For gel, with a gear driven orbital, course and medium wool pads take out scratches, and course and medium foam pads polish. For tough oxidation or thick scratches I use a wool pad and a rotary followed by the orbital to polish. Then apply wax.

                          https://www.autogeek.net/rupes-wool-pads.html

                          https://www.autogeek.net/rupes-mille-foam-pads.html

                          https://www.autogeek.net/rupes-polishers.html

                          You don't need to run the buffers all that often if you keep the boat clean and waxed, but with a black boat, I personally can't see going without some sort of mechanical polisher to use when needed and being happy with how it looks. You are gonna get scuffs if you use the boat, but short of deep scratches, minor scuffs polish right out of the gel with the right tools.

                          I also like Babes boat products, including Babes Seat Soap and their seat protector which has UV protection. I would use the 303 fabric coating on the cover and bimini and regular 303 on the dash and other interior items for the UV protection.

                          Oh, and your boat looks awesome. Congrats on the new ride!
                          A BIG thanks for all that info. ... really appreciate it. I tried last night to find Mike’s book "Mike Phillips’ How To Detail Boats With Marine 31" —to no avail, it is currently out of stock/out of print (I also sent an e-mail along to his site) ... I will keep working to find it! I suspect that I can get a long way from the videos and reading around the Marine 31 site. Perhaps you would consider starting a "lending library" ... I can see now that I really need to a handle on the maintenance of a dark-colored boat?! After ordering some detailing spray and microfiber towels, my next step will be get the Rupes machine and pads. I feel confident that I can get the gel coat finish issues resolved, but I am most concerned about the rub rail scuffing, esp. around the cleat areas? I will try to post up some images the next time I get out to the boat.

                          I am also long-time fan of both the Babes products and 303 Aerospace offerings (for both surfaces and fabrics); however, I was kind of cautious as per the Nautique Owner's Manual listing only soap and water, Formula 409 and Fantastic—I mean, I get using the least abrasive cleaner for the job, but then there is what is in the manual (see pic):

                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Upholstery Warning - 1.jpg
Views:	198
Size:	19.9 KB
ID:	620972


                          Is ALL Nautique vinyl treated with PreFixx? (I don’t see anything specifically notated in the Standard Features/Pricing and Options for our boat.) Surely we can take advantage of modern products developed to protect and extend marine surfaces and vinyl?

                          Again, as I have only spent my time (a bunch of it ... ha!) taking care of our old '94 SN … I just want to take proper care of our new boat!

                          Infinity ... your boat and trailer look amazing (I am going to message you on the Gator setup ... really sharp)! I think I am going to follow your advice and put some marine wax on that spot before we go to the water each time?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I reached out to Nautique's "Customer Care/Warranty Supervisor" (very helpful) and thought I would pass this along the following information:

                            Turns out, PreFixx is actually another brand and is one that we used some time ago and didn’t change the verbiage in the manual. However, Sradling, our current vinyl supplier said what is highlighted below.

                            Prefix is a different vinyl than Spradling.
                            We also say that the material does not need a conditioner.
                            Many products on the market that are advertised to condition vinyl have Petroleum chemicals in them that can cause vinyl to dry and crack.
                            Best Regards

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gsyogi View Post
                              I reached out to Nautique's "Customer Care/Warranty Supervisor" (very helpful) and thought I would pass this along the following information:
                              I read that as some products will hurt the seats and it is just easier to say you don't need anything. Nevertheless, sun kill interiors. I am in the camp that believes you want something safe that has UV protection. I use Babes Seat Seat Saver (it has UV protection) on the vinyl seats and 303 on the dash, etc.; my dealer puts 303 on everything, seats included. I just sold my '16 and the seats and dash looked brand new. Babes Seat Saver won't hurt the seats.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X