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G23 Battery Rotate?

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  • #16
    Sounds like an aftermarket switch is on the way

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    • #17
      Originally posted by GMLIII View Post
      Sounds like an aftermarket switch is on the way
      No KIDDING! Why would they go to a switch that offers LESS functionality? While I'm at it, I don't even understand why they still offer a boat with only 1 battery. I don't think WLM will even order a boat that way.

      -Charles

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      • #18
        I am wondering if you actually aren't only on one battery when in the "on" position. It may be that each battery is dedicated to different things - one being engine and related - 2 batteries, each with its own circuit. The second position merely allows you run in parallel, in case the "primary" or engine battery is low and you need to use all available battery power. Perhaps the demand on circuit/battery B is less than A, so it functions as kind of a reserve, but it isn't sitting there doing nothing.

        What I can come up with for a "why". Thoughts?
        Last edited by blueroom; 1 week ago.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by NautiqueJeff View Post
          But you can't switch between the two single batteries.
          With the dual circuit plus switch, this is a true statement. However, reading the OPs opening post, this would be an entirely different discussion from what he's asking.

          Same batteries....
          In an ideal world, you need a cranking and a deepcycle with your setup.

          Sounds like no one has explained how your battery setup functions. Neither battery is getting over worked, while the other sits idle. Both work, each trip out. Each battery bank has a specific task. Main engine battery cranks the engine and powers its systems. The other battery powers the non-engine systems like audio, ballast, lights, heater, helm, etc.

          So no need to physically swap batteries, no need for an aftermarket switch, get in boat, turn switch to on. Put boat away for the day, turn switch to off. Need and emergency crank, turn switch to the yellow COMBINE position. Never a bad idea to plug in the on-board charger when the boat is not in use. Dont wait til the day before going out, best to recharge a low battery right away.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by MLA View Post
            So no need to physically swap batteries, no need for an aftermarket switch, get in boat, turn switch to on. Put boat away for the day, turn switch to off. Need and emergency crank, turn switch to the yellow COMBINE position. Never a bad idea to plug in the on-board charger when the boat is not in use. Dont wait til the day before going out, best to recharge a low battery right away.
            OK, that does seem to be the most reasonable explanation. Looks like we were just making too much of it. I think I was just used to the "old school" switch.

            Thanks, MLA!

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            • #21
              Definitely interesting. I suppose there were a lot of smart people figuring out how to make the old system better. In the 1, 2, or both current system if you want to leave the bilge pumps on for long periods of time but only drain one battery you can pick 1 OR 2, leaving the other isolated. In the current system I would suppose you would have to turn the boat to ON, as off is probably all off. So if you turn the boat to on, it would just drain the battery that has the bilge pump.

              But wouldn't it happen from time to time that you would have a parasitic somewhere on the engine starting system side? Are the engine fuel pumps on the starting system side, who knows? Wouldn't they cycle over a number of days/weeks. People do leave their boats with bilge pumps on for quite a while.

              I don't know, not really enough info, but I suppose they got it all figured out. But I sure like that when I park and listen to the stereo I just move the switch to one of the two batteries, knowing the other is isolated. They have moved away from the isolation concept, I guess to just on and off.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by MLA View Post

                With the dual circuit plus switch, this is a true statement. However, reading the OPs opening post, this would be an entirely different discussion from what he's asking.



                In an ideal world, you need a cranking and a deepcycle with your setup.

                Sounds like no one has explained how your battery setup functions. Neither battery is getting over worked, while the other sits idle. Both work, each trip out. Each battery bank has a specific task. Main engine battery cranks the engine and powers its systems. The other battery powers the non-engine systems like audio, ballast, lights, heater, helm, etc.

                So no need to physically swap batteries, no need for an aftermarket switch, get in boat, turn switch to on. Put boat away for the day, turn switch to off. Need and emergency crank, turn switch to the yellow COMBINE position. Never a bad idea to plug in the on-board charger when the boat is not in use. Dont wait til the day before going out, best to recharge a low battery right away.
                Thanks for explains this to us. Helpful

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                • #23
                  In the 1, 2, or both current system if you want to leave the bilge pumps on for long periods of time but only drain one battery you can pick 1 OR 2, leaving the other isolated
                  An auto bilge should be wired battery direct, not to the boat side of the switch. This leaves the bilge able to operate while the main battery switch is off. And even better, only one battery has a draw, the other is still isolated, same with the other switch style.

                  All other loads/draws should be wired to the boat side of the switch, so when the switch is off, everything else is OFF.

                  This is not a new or revolutionary setup. Ive been installing them on boats for 10+ years. Many manufactures have been using this setup for years. So there really wasnt anything for Nautique to R&D or figure out.

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                  • #24
                    Do you think they made that change, wiring bilge to one of the batteries, or are you suggesting they should have? Used to be if the battery switch was on 0 you got no bilge.

                    It would be easy enough for someone to find out by turning to off, and telling if the bilge runs. I betcha bilge won't run.

                    P.S. When you set them up yourselves do you prefer float bilge or nautiques bilge pumps which cycle?
                    Last edited by scottb7; 1 week ago.

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                    • #25
                      I dont know how they setup the bilge, as I hadnt realized they made the move to the dual circuit plus switch

                      I prefer a water sensor being it a float or electrical, over the cycling/sensing auto bilge.

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                      • #26
                        OK - That is what I was starting to suspect last night. Makes sense.

                        So..... I think I might still advocate for a battery swap now and then. Given that the batteries are the same, at least in my boat, one battery still is seemingly getting a deep workout compared to the other.

                        We had 30 lake days last season. Let's say on average we had 5 people go in the water each day, and they had 5 engine starts throughout the day wakeboarding and surfing each. That's 750 engine starts a summer - not to mention messing around, filling/emptying ballast, swimming, lunch, breaks, docking, bathroom runs, etc. That's all coming off of one battery.

                        Might be overkill, but I think I will start doing an annual physical battery swap. Not a super time consuming thing, and it can't hurt - hopefully.

                        Thanks everyone for a helpful discussion!
                        Last edited by blueroom; 1 week ago.

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                        • #27
                          Kinda curious about the switch "switch" also? Trying a different one due having a bunch of switches break?. I experienced one breaking first hand, so thats the reason for my thought.

                          Sent from my Pixel 2 using PLT Nautique mobile app


                          2013 SAN 230 2006 SSN 210 (SOLD)

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                          • #28
                            d_nodixon

                            The Blue Sea Systems switch is the best made in the industry, IMO. Going with any other brand would be a downgrade IMO. I cant recall what CC used in 06, but the switch used for the past number of years, is the Blue Sea switch.

                            Handles do occasionally break ans they are available for replacement. If the switch fails internally, or if the body breaks, you need to look to make sure the cables are secured so their weight is not resting on the switch posts.

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                            • #29


                              Makes sense, thanks for the insight

                              Sent from my Pixel 2 using PLT Nautique mobile app

                              2013 SAN 230 2006 SSN 210 (SOLD)

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